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Lower School 3-5

In her seminal oration, “The Lost Tools of Learning” Dororthy Sayers shared a series of insightful and influential observations with her audience, most of which were based around the mismatch of existing curricular focus and the natural human development of students at specified ages.  After identifying the areas of concern, she proposed a new system of education - one out of which the classical school movement was born - and laid the foundation for a new order of instruction, and more importantly, a new focus for educators that mirrored the intellectual and developmental strengths of each age group of students.  It is in that tradition, and using that initial wisdom (and the nearly century of instruction and optimization that has come since) that we at Optima Classical Academy are building upon to deliver timely, appropriate, and developmentally sound education for all of our students.


 

In 3rd through 5th grade, students are naturally curious, adept at memorization and repetition, and benefit mightily from exposure to excellent writing and historical organization of events that will establish a framework for further historical study.  At Optima Classical Academy, we introduce our students to excellent literature - some that they will read, some that will be read to them, and some that they will learn to recite with clarity and precise diction. 

Students will memorize foundational information, explore western and world geography, develop number sense, and form a structured understanding of the order of western history.  These grade levels are essential for student success throughout their academic career, not least of all because the curriculum is appropriate, challenging, and engaging, fanning the flames of their curiosity and furthering their drive for understanding of the world around them.

Above all, and in every lesson, Optima Classical Academy strives to instill virtue in its students (we call them scholars).  At an early age, we focus on the virtue of self-governance and will be an active partner with parents as our scholars develop the virtues and habits that we know will carry them far in life.